Gusto Event Page - WHAT IT MEANT TO BE MODERN 1910–1965: American Works on Paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection

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WHAT IT MEANT TO BE MODERN 1910–1965: American Works on Paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection

Venue:

Address: 1300 Elmwood Ave.

City: Buffalo, NY 14222 USA

Event Date/Time:

April 14th, 201710:00 am - 5:00 pm
April 15th, 201710:00 am - 5:00 pm
April 16th, 201710:00 am - 5:00 pm
View 72 occurances

Price: $5.00 - $10.00

Category: Art

Announced-date: 2017-04-03

Brief-description: work of Oscar Bluemner, Charles E. Burchfield, Stuart Davis, John Marin, and Charles Sheeler, through 6/23.

Event url: burchfieldpenney.org.

About: The visionary work of Oscar Bluemner, Charles E. Burchfield, Stuart Davis, John Marin, and Charles Sheeler will be the subject of a traveling exhibition opening at the Burchfield Penney Art Center at SUNY Buffalo State Friday, April 14. What it Meant to be Modern, 1910–1965: American Works on Paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection will share the magic of the modernist movement of the first half of the twentieth century. The exhibition is organized by the Denver Art Museum and generously supported by the Eleanor and Henry Hitchcock Foundation. The works in the Kennedy Collection represent disparate moments in the careers of five artists and span more than 50 years—from John Marin’s Downtown from the River of 1910 to Charles E. Burchfield’s Dandelion Seed Heads and the Moon. The ages of the featured artists span more than 25 years with Oscar Bluemner and Marin already grown when the two youngest, Stuart Davis and Burchfield, were born in the early 1890s. “For those who feel that they are familiar with Charles Burchfield’s work, this provides us with completely different context,” said Scott F. Propeack, Burchfield Penney associate director and chief curator. “When you see Burchfield—next to Bluemner—next to Sheeler, it makes you look at his work differently. You understand him as more than the person that captured his surroundings in a magical way, you see him as part of a generation that was asking us to reconsider what we see. As Nannette V. Maciejunes points out in her accompanying essay, watercolor is in essence the tool of American Modernism. It is a medium that can be bold and experimental, that which is the essence of all that period stood for.” “Where some of the images flirt with abstraction, as seen in Charles Sheeler and John Marin, others experiment with a pulsing sense of nature endowed with an incredible lightness of being, as does Charles E. Burchfield,” said curator Julie Augur, adjunct curator of drawings, modern and contemporary Art, Denver Art Museum. “Oscar Bluemner’s pie

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